Birth certificate help by state

  • In most cases start with your state vital statistic office

    Post here if you have info on how to get a birth certificate in your state

    Alabama

    Alabama - AL makes it very easy. Call the Dept of Vital Records in Montgomery at (334) 206-5418 and ask them to mail you a "homebirth packet". They will sound confused, put you on hold for a minute, and then happily agree and ask for your mailing address. You have one year from the date of your child's birth to submit it without red tape. If you wait past a year they require more proof. You just have to fill out basic info for the packet, and then submit a separate paper with the names, addresses and phone numbers of (1) a doctor who saw you when you were pregnant and (2) a doctor who saw the baby. I used my chiro for both with no problems. There are other options if you didn't see any type of health professional, such as a notarized letter from a clergyman, employer, etc. They require a copy of a bill in your or your husband's name at the address of the birth and a copy of your driver's license. It is $15 for a certified copy of the birth certificate.

    As long as the paperwork is returned within one year you can check a box to have your child's ssc number issued. After one year, you must go to the ssc office. It takes about 2 week in my experience to get the birth certificate back.

    Alaska

    American Samoa

    Arizona

    Arkansas

    California

    info packet

    http://www.cdph.ca.gov/certlic/birthdeathmar/Documents/Out-of-Hospital%20Birth%20Package.pdf

    Colorado

    for anyone having uc in colorado, i live in arapahoe county and was able to get birth certificate information from tri-county health department vital records. they will send you a packet of all the information you need to fill out to obtain birth certificate. there number is 303-220-9200 and address is 6162 s willow dr. suite 100 greenwood villiage, co 80111

    Connecticut

    Delaware

    District of Columbia

    Florida

    Georgia

    Guam

    Hawaii

    Idaho

    Illinois

    Indiana

    Iowa

    Kansas

    Kentucky

    Louisiana

    Maine

    Maryland

    Maryland- You have to call the local health dept. within 72 hours to report the birth. You will need proof of pregnancy from a health care provider: doctor, health dept nurse etc. Need a photo copy of both parent's state ids, proof that you were in the house on the day of birth (ie. utility bill). You can get in contact with the health dept beforehand. If you are UC/Freebirthing you have an easier time than if you were having a midwife. Midwives attending home birth in MD is a felony and they ALWAYS try and get your midwife's name.

    Massachusetts

    Michigan

    Minnesota

    Mississippi

    MISSISSIPPI

    Vital Statistics:

    Jeanie Wiliams 601-576-7189 (Northern MS)

    Ed Berry 601-576-7965 (Southern MS)

    these are the two field reps for the vitals statistics office in Jackson that handle this

    2 proofs: (1) a signed statement from someone who attended the birth or arrived shortly after, must be notarized or

    (2) statement from the Dr or midwife on office letterhead saying yes, you were pregnant and saw the Dr./midwife at least once

    (if you never saw the dr./midwife I understand two statements from witnesses will suffice)

    Witness statement should read as follows:

    I, (name) witnessed the birth of (person's child) at (residence) on (date)

    If you want newborn screening tests done (for 50+ genetic diseases) you should call your local health department and set a time to come and get the blood drawn (heelprick) ~ $70.

    Missouri

    Montana

    Contact the local registrar and ask for the birth certificate questionairre(it can be mailed or you can go in for it). The local registrar is usually located in the County Health Department. You will be asked to provide proof of your pregnancy, proof of live birth(immunization record, or newborn checkup record from a doctor) and proof of your residency(a bill mailed to your address). You turn the filled out questionairre, proof of pregnancy, live birth, proof of residency in to the local registrar and they will send in the information for a birth certificate and social security number/card.

    Nebraska

    Nevada

    New Hampshire

    New Jersey

    New Mexico

    New York

    North Carolina

    Ok for NC you will need to go to your local health departments Office of Vital Statistics and fill out a birth information worksheet. With that you will need: your ID and proof of address. It is also preferred that you have proof of pregnancy as well OR proof of live birth, i didnt have proof of pregnancy but i was nursing baby in my wrap at the time i was filling out paperwork so i dont know if that counted =) It was very easy and only took a few minutes. We got the SSN within a week and can get the copy of the birth certificate whenever (we just did this last month and baby is almost 5mo now) They nchomebirth website i believe says you have to do this within 10 days of the birth by my daughter was 4 months old when we finally got around to doing it and they didnt even hesitate.

    North Dakota

    Northern Marianas Islands

    Ohio

    Oklahoma

    Oregon

    Pennsylvania

    Puerto Rico

    Rhode Island

    South Carolina

    South Dakota

    Tennessee

    Texas

    Utah

    Vermont

    If your baby was born without a medical professional present, you may call the Vital Records staff at 802-863-7275 or (within Vermont) 800-439-5008. They will assist you in completing your birth certificate.

    http://healthvermont.gov/research/records/complete_birth.aspx

    Virginia

    Virgin Islands

    Washington

    West Virginia

    West Virginia- Contact your local health dept and they will provide you with a home birth kit. They were including the birth certificates in the kit but were changing things around so they stopped including them. I'm sure the nurse at the health dept. can help with it. WV is GREAT about home births.

    Wisconsin

    Wyoming

    Birth certificate info from mothering forum: http://www.mothering.com/community/t/770140/getting-the-birth-certificate

    (some of the info on the mothering forum is pretty old and may be out-dated but it is a place to start)



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  • Alabama - AL makes it very easy. Call the Dept of Vital Records in Montgomery at (334) 206-5418 and ask them to mail you a "homebirth packet". They will sound confused, put you on hold for a minute, and then happily agree and ask for your mailing address. You have one year from the date of your child's birth to submit it without red tape. If you wait past a year they require more proof. You just have to fill out basic info for the packet, and then submit a separate paper with the names, addresses and phone numbers of (1) a doctor who saw you when you were pregnant and (2) a doctor who saw the baby. I used my chiro for both with no problems. There are other options if you didn't see any type of health professional, such as a notarized letter from a clergyman, employer, etc. They require a copy of a bill in your or your husband's name at the address of the birth and a copy of your driver's license. It is $15 for a certified copy of the birth certificate.

    As long as the paperwork is returned within one year you can check a box to have your child's ssc number issued. After one year, you must go to the ssc office. It takes about 2 week in my experience to get the birth certificate back.

  • Montana-

    Contact the local registrar and ask for the birth certificate questionairre(it can be mailed or you can go in for it). The local registrar is usually located in the County Health Department. You will be asked to provide proof of your pregnancy, proof of live birth(immunization record, or newborn checkup record from a doctor) and proof of your residency(a bill mailed to your address). You turn the filled out questionairre, proof of pregnancy, live birth, proof of residency in to the local registrar and they will send in the information for a birth certificate and social security number/card.

  • Maryland- You have to call the local health dept. within 72 hours to report the birth. You will need proof of pregnancy from a health care provider: doctor, health dept nurse etc. Need a photo copy of both parent's state ids, proof that you were in the house on the day of birth (ie. utility bill). You can get in contact with the health dept beforehand. If you are UC/Freebirthing you have an easier time than if you were having a midwife. Midwives attending home birth in MD is a felony and they ALWAYS try and get your midwife's name.

    West Virginia- Contact your local health dept and they will provide you with a home birth kit. They were including the birth certificates in the kit but were changing things around so they stopped including them. I'm sure the nurse at the health dept. can help with it. WV is GREAT about home births.

  • California - Just wanted to add more info.....

    Get a copy of the "How to Register an Out-of-hospital Birth" Packet from your County's Vital Records, County Recorder's Office or online (link already published above). You will also need proof of pregnancy from a MD or Licensed Midwife. Most Planned Parenthoods have a "Pregnancy Test Verification" form for Medi-Cal and WIC patients, I payed $20 for mine. If you have a regular OB do it, it might cost upto $200 since most insurance companies don't cover pregnancy tests. Make sure the MD signs it, most will provide a stamp. As soon as baby is born, make an appointment with your local Vital Records office to register the birth no later than 10 days postpartum. If you're not married to the father of the baby, you can find the "Voluntary Declaration of Paternity" form either at Vital Records or Child Support Services, it's best to fill that form out after the birth but before your appointment at Vital Records, in the presence of the county staff so you don't have to pay for notary.

  • Texas

    I recently gathered all of this information for my UC which should take place sometime in Dec 2012 or Jan 2013.

    Here is the link to the handbook to register an unassisted birth in Texas. It gives specific instructions and required proof. I called my local county clerks office to inquire as the document states that only 1 affidavit will be accepted when you submit a request for a birth certificate. I told the woman that in some cases the affidavit(s) will be the only option, especially in cases where only the mother and father are present at the birth. She said this isn't uncommon and to provide as much documentation as possible to avoid any complications.

    http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/Layouts/ContentPage.aspx?PageID=56719&id=56730&terms=handbook+register+birth

    You will need to complete these two documents as well and provide them to your County Clerks office within 5 days of the birth. Must be in the same county where the birth took place.

    Medical Worksheet document title vs109.2

    http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=30528

    Mother's worksheet document title vs109.1

    http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=30524

    If the links do not work just go to the dshs.state.tx.us home site and search for "handbook on birth" , "vs109.2" and "vs109.1" to locate.

    Here is an excerpt from the handbook regarding detailed requirements for UC or

    Non-Institutional Birth Not Attended By A Registered, Certified Or Documented Health Care Provider.

    "If there is no physician, midwife, or person acting as midwife in attendance at a non-institutional birth, documentation is required from the parent(s) before a birth certificate may be filed.

    In an effort to control fraudulent filings of birth records and to place control over blank forms, the Texas Vital Statistics Unit (VSU) and Texas Board of Health developed and approved rules for filing birth certificates for children born outside licensed institutions. [25 TAC §181.26] To insure uniform compliance throughout the state, VSU developed the following administrative comments and instructions.

    To file a birth certificate with the appropriate local registrar the following proof must be presented to the local registrar by the person in attendance at the birth in the following order of preference:

    The father or mother of the child; or

    The owner or householder of the premises where the birth occurs.

    The registrar may provide to the person filing the birth record a “Mothers Work Sheet” in order to gather the information to be placed on the birth record.

    A birth a birth certificate can be filed only upon personal presentation of the following evidence.

    Note: Only one affidavit of personal knowledge of one of the four items should be used.

    Proof Of Pregnancy, Presented In Following Order Of Preference;

    An affidavit (notarized) presented from a licensed, registered, or certified health care provider who is qualified to determine pregnancy as part of the scope of his or her license or registration, or certification; or

    An affidavit of personal knowledge (notarized) along with photocopy of ID (for example, a driver’s license or government ID, etc.) presented from one person, other than the parents, having knowledge of the pregnancy/birth

    Proof That The Infant Was Born Alive;

    A medical record or a letter from a licensed, registered, or certified health care provider or medical institution; or

    An affidavit of personal knowledge (notarized) along with photocopy of ID (for example, a driver’s license or government ID, etc.) presented from one person, other than the parents, having knowledge of the pregnancy/birth.

    Proof That The Infant Was Born In The Registration District;

    If the birth occurred outside the mother’s primary place of residence, proof shall consist of an affidavit (notarized) along with a photocopy of ID from a person having knowledge of the mother’s presence in the registration district on the date of the birth.

    If the birth occurred in the mother’s primary place of residence, proof of residence in the following order of preference:

    A utility bill, telephone, or other bill which includes the mother’s name and address;

    A rent receipt which includes the mother’s name, address, and signature of the mother’s landlord;

    A driver’s license, or state issued identification card, which includes the mother’s current address on the face of the license or card;

    An envelope addressed to the mother at her place of residence, and post marked prior to the date of birth; or

    An affidavit of personal knowledge (notarized) attesting to the mother’s place of residence along with a photocopy of ID from a person, other than the father, who was either living with the mother at the time of the alleged birth, or has other knowledge of the mother’s residency.

    Proof That The Infant Was Born On The Date Stated.

    A medical record or a letter from a licensed, registered, or certified health care provider or medical institution; or

    An affidavit of personal knowledge (notarized) presented from one person along with photocopy of ID, other than the parents, having knowledge of the pregnancy/birth.

    Other Supplemental Information Proving Home Birth

    At the discretion of the local registrar, these procedures may be supplemented with any additional requirements needed to verify the circumstances of the birth. Additional requirements may include, but are not limited to, one or more of the following:

    An unannounced visit by a public health nurse, other health professional, registrar staff, or other person including city, county, state, or federal law enforcement officers, prior to registering the birth. This paragraph does not permit nor give authority to enter these premises unless permission is obtained from the occupant at the time of the visit;

    Multiple forms of identifying documents, with or without photographs, when the documents described in this section are unavailable;

    Personal appearance of both parents, either together or separately; or

    Personal appearance of the infant whose birth certificate the parents are attempting to file

    Any person who cannot meet the documentation requirements should be referred to the State Registrar and the Fraud Prevention Program. See the information under “Persons and/or Records Not Meeting Requirements for Filing.”

    The documentation that has been submitted as proof should be returned to the person filing the record after the birth record is accepted.

    Each local registrar must notify the Fraud Prevention Program of any suspicious documents or records submitted or filed with his or her office.

    If the individual(s) attempting to file the birth records of a child not born in an institution cannot meet the four essential elements required for filing (proof of pregnancy, proof the infant was born alive, proof the infant was born in the registration district, and proof the infant was born on the date stated), the local registrar will forward the record and all documentation to the State Registrar for his or her determination.

    The local registrar will send a cover letter with the documentation explaining why he or she cannot accept the record for filing.

    The local registrar will give a letter to the parent(s) and/or person trying to file the record telling them why he or she cannot accept the record for filing and that the request and documentation have been sent to Austin for the State Registrar’s determination.

    Upon receipt of the birth record from the local registrar within one year of the date of birth, the State Registrar will direct the Fraud Prevention Program to further verify or investigate as necessary to determine to accept or not accept the documentation sent. If the documentation is deemed unacceptable the State Registrar will send a letter referring the parent(s) to a Texas district court for a judicial determination and order to file a Certificate of Birth. If the birth occurred more than a year before the parent(s) attempt to file a delayed birth certificate, and the documentation is deemed unacceptable, the State Registrar may refer the case to the county judge of the alleged county of birth for a judicial decision. " [/b][/i]

    Feel free to pm me if you have any questions.

  • Utah - You have to go to the Health Department and there is the Office of Vital Statistics. There you will ask for the homebirth package. This includes all forms they require you to fill out (maternal worksheet, newborn worksheet). An attendant has to sign (my husband did it). I don't know if you did it by yourself (if you could be your own attendant??) They will also require proof of residency (since that's where the baby was born) such as a rental agreement or mortgage statement. 2 utility bills and prenatal records. If any are missing you can alternatively submit a doctor's statement (from a doctor who examined your newborn) or church records (baptism etc.). Getting the form was the harder part, the lady kept asking me if I was going to seek a provider and stuff. Turning it all in afterwards was easy and we got the birth certificate without a problem as well as the social security number.

    You can find the application for the birth certificate online, but unfortunately you cannot find the paperwork to report a birth there, only in person. They probably don't want to encourage you to do that yourself.. ;-)

  • I am currently dealing with this now. Unfortunately I went through my city clerks office and asked for a homebirth packet. I should have never done so. Since then the woman at the city clerk has been asking me for letters that aren't even needed per stated in the worksheet directions. I am currently talking directly to the dept of vitals in Boston to see if I can just submit the worksheet and what is REALLY needed in order to get the bc to them. It's been 2 months since the birth of my baby and initially the witch asked me for a notarized letter from the Ped. That the baby received post- natal care. I did so for both our Ped and family doctor and went to turn it in. She said that it wasn't enough. Then she said that I needed a letter from the rn who saw my son the day after I had him. I told her that I had a newborn assessment from her and she made a copy of it and that wasnt enough...the rn will not give me a notarized letter. The rn who is also a midwife refuses because she has never had to do one before in her 20 plus years doing homebirths in my state. So in hoping he main office in Boston will assist me in obtaining the cert instead.

  • Ohio

    So, you start by going to your county's vital statistics office, ours was in the city hall in downtown Cleveland, and ask for a homebirth packet for the birth certificate. Try getting it before you give birth. We were told by them that we needed to wait until after the baby was born, but then they wanted proof of pregnancy, signed by a Dr of some sort and I was no longer pregnant but I had some paperwork from the hospital that they accepted. just fill out all the papers the best you can and turn them in. Then they'll ask you to make an appt to come in to sign the birth certificate, I'm doing that tomorrow so hopefully that will be it! It's annoying but definitely worth it and way better than going to a hospital!